Category: General Thoughts and Learning Points

St Philip’s Cathedral Birmingham – Burne-Jones Stained-Glass

This visit to Birmingham Cathedral provided another sense of an ending for the course and unified some of the elements. Towards the beginning of this course one of the annotations was of the Rose Window at Chartres, one of my final pieces of work was the essay on the religious paintings of Edward Burne-Jones. I …

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Sociological Context

I was reading an article in the Guardian in which the play Art is discussed by three writers. The article was very interesting in the way it discusses what the play says (or doesn’t say) about the contemporary art world. I was, however, taken by one comment made by the Guardian art critic Adrian Searle. …

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Inspired

At the beginning of the year the Guardian printed a number of articles under the theme of “the uplifting power of art”. A number of well-known writers from the fields of music, philosophy and literature, “choose the work they turn to for replenishment”. Jonathan Jones chose Watteau’s Pierrot; Alain de Botton selected Woman Taking Tea …

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Prehistoric Art at the British Museum

Earlier in the course I annotated a cave painting from the Chauvet cave in France. It was interesting to do, but had to be done from printed and electronic images from books or online. It would have been fascinating to see the original, but, simply not possible I was, therefore, very interested when I visited …

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Project 11: Study Report on your own specialism

Image by carulmare [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons   I have now submitted my Critical Review “Was Edward Burne-Jones a Great Religious Painter” to my tutor. Following feedback on a very early draft I have changed the focus of the essay. I looked at quite a few contemporary writings about the Pre-Raphaelites and …

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When Do Ethnographic Objects Become Art?

When researching reviews of the Fiji exhibition at the Sainsbury Centre, I came across an article in Apollo Magazine, (which included a preview of the Fiji exhibition), entitled “When Do Ethnographic Objects Become Art?” By Nicholas Thomas. He describes how in the 1960s and 70s, anthropologists “well aware of the stimulus provided by African, Oceanic …

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The Turner Prize 2016 (Part 2).

The winner of the Turner prize has just been announced, and it certainly wasn’t my favourite of the four artists. As mentioned in a previous post, the work that I appreciated the most was by Michael Dean. His work said more to me, with a political message, than any of the other exhibitors. However the …

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Fiji exhibition – what is art (continued)

Just when I thought that I had resolved the issue of “what is art” the Sainsbury Centre challenges me again. I visited the Fiji exhibition and some of the pieces made me think again “is this art?”, Why is it displayed in a visual art gallery rather than in an ethnographic museum. When entering the …

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What is a painting?

Having struggled with the definition of art, I found myself fundamentally questioning what is a painting? The stimulus for this was reading about Gerhard Richter’s Strip Paintings one of which I had seen at Tate Modern. The Tate website says that although Richter refers to the Strip works as paintings “despite their name they have no actual …

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The Turner Prize 2016, shortlist exhibition at Tate Britain

On the way to London to see this exhibition I read an article in the Tate magazine about Arte Util – art as tools. It referred, in part, to last year’s Turner prize winner, Assemble, which produced functional objects as art – or put art at the centre of producing functional objects.   There is …

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