Category: Images of Oriental Art

Wayang Shadow Puppet

I was interested to visit the British Museum exhibition of South East Asian Shadow puppets as, many years ago, I had lived in Indonesia and had seen them there. Seeing them displayed as an exhibit perhaps changed the way in which I viewed them when in Java. I think I probably concentrated more on the …

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Prajnaparamita

Back in the 1980’s I worked for three years in Indonesia and had the great fortune to visit Borobudur while I was there. It was therefore of particular interest to me to look at Indonesian works of art, particularly from the Buddhist and Hindu periods. When in the British Museum I looked at the exhibit …

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Sultan Muhammad Adil Shah and Ikhlas Khan riding an elephant Bijapur

Perhaps this is stretching the definition of ‘Oriental Art’ to include the Indian subcontinent! But I really liked this painting. It is one of very few so far where I have not seen the original, rather commenting on it from a website image and photograph from a book. What I had not appreciated before researching …

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Statue of Buddha Amida

This was another statue from the British Museum. Unfortunately it was in a glass case and it was not possible to walk around it to see the reverse, the light was also dimmed I suppose for conservation purposes.  Neverthe less it was good to see it at first hand, there was a great sense of …

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Luohan

Some of the figures in the Chinese gallery were very different from other Buddhist portrayals that I had seen, for example the  Laughing Buddha However I decided to make my comments on a different glazed stoneware figure, that of a Luohan. Comments on Glazed Stoneware Figure of a Luohan

Yamagoshi Amida zu (Amida crossing the mountains)

The British Museum has a good collection of Japanese, Chinese and South East Asian art. I used my trip there to look closely at a number of different pieces so that I would be able to comment on them for this exercise. It was interesting to compare religious works of art from Asia with comparable …

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