Category: Exercises

Exercise 3.6: The Memory of Photography

This was a challenging essay to get into and to understand just what the main points of Bate’s argument was. He refers, amongst others, to the works of Freud, Derrida, Foucault and Barthes in his examination of quite how photographs preserve, influence or even suppress memories. He starts by drawing on the distinction drawn by …

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Exercise 3.5: Local History

This exercise asks for a short investigation into a historical aspect of the area in which I live. For this task I chose to look into the history of brush making in Wymondham where I live. In particular I wanted to look at the history of the Briton Brush Factory, which was demolished some years …

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Exercise 3.4: A Persuasive Image

PART 1 For this exercise I have chosen 3 images that argue a particular point. I have tried to choose three very different types of image, but all three have a related theme – the environment. The first image is a very explicit message constructed by Peter Kennard and Cat Phillipps, the image can be …

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Exercise 3.3: ‘Late Photography’

David Campany’s essay “Safety in Numbness” takes as it’s starting point a documentary shown on Channel 4 which followed the photographer Joel Meyerowitz as he documented the aftermath of the 9/11 attack on the twin towers of the World Trade Centre in New York. Campany’s main thrust seems to be that when events such as …

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Exercise 3.2: Postcard Views

Part 1 It was quite a revelation to see the postcards that we had sent from holidays over the past few years. All of the  cards were very much in the ‘picturesque’ category. ” order_by=”sortorder” order_direction=”ASC” returns=”included” maximum_entity_count=”500″] Interestingly, most images seem to have been photographed from a very elevated position, aerial photography in some …

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Exercise 3.1: Reflecting on the picturesque

What is the ‘picturesque’? SMITH (2003) describes the picturesque as “the middle ground between the extremes of the beautiful and sublime – evoking a sense of reality of the landscape”. Discussing Gilpin’s notion of ‘picturesque’ in the British Landscape, the Victoria and Albert Museum, describes how 18th century travelers “learned to look at the British countryside …

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